Interval Training – An Overview

Interval Training – An Overview

If you’re serious about improving your running, Interval Training should be a key component to your training plan. It is simple and can be done in numerous ways. On the road, track or treadmill, varying distance or a time. it really is that simple.

So What Is Interval Training?

Interval TrainingInterval training is a physical activity consisting of alternating periods of high and low intensity activity.

That’s great but let’s put it even more simply. Run hard and run fast followed by a period of recovery repeated a number of times. The key to it is consistency. The time or distance at which you work hard must be repeatable, as is the time or distance you select to rest.

Benefits Of Interval Training

Interval training has many benefits. This is why most runners who take their running seriously, or want to achieve their goal add it to their programme.

  • Time Saver – Due to the nature of interval training it can’t be done for extended periods of time. This means it can easily be fitted around your busy day.
  • Calorific– There are some out there who purely run to manage their weight. Due to the intensity of interval training, you will burn more calories than if you went on a long run.
  • Healthy Heart – Over time your heart will get stronger meaning that it is able to pump more blood around the body per beat. The less beats your heart needs to do the less it gets used and the longer it will last.
  • Faster and Longer – Interval training will help teach your body to deal with lactic acid build up. The result of this means you can go for longer and harder before tiring.

Example Interval Session

These are just some of the benefits to Interval Training. Now let’s look at an example session.

Treadmill Session

Warm Up

10 minutes at a steady pace to warm the deep muscle tissue followed by some dynamic stretching to activate and mobilise the joints.

Interval Session

  • Stand with your legs either side of the treadmill belt and increase the speed to 19 kph and allow for 1 minute to pass.
  • On 1 minute get on the treadmill and run for 40 seconds.
  • Once 40 seconds has passed stand either side of the belt for 20 seconds.
  • Repeat 9 times.
  • Following the 9th effort recover for 1 minute and low the speed to 18 kph.
  • Once 1 minutes rest is up get back on the treadmill and repeat however, this time for 30 seconds on and 30 seconds off.
  • Repeat 9 times.

Cool Down

5 minute light jog followed by stretching.

Now this is an example of the session. You can adapt the speed to suit you. However, remember that it should be high intensity. It isn’t designed to be comfortable but I guarantee you will feel great when it’s done.

I will be back over the coming weeks with some other ideas and alternative sessions. In the meantime, you can read more advice and insights from me at my own website.

Be TrueSapien. Challenge Life.

Triathlon Winter Training – Strength and Conditioning Introduction

Triathlon Winter Training – Strength and Conditioning Introduction

Strength and conditioning (S&C), is great for injury prevention, correcting muscle imbalances and posture. It will help you become a stronger, and therefore, faster triathlete.

A Year Round ‘Staple’

Regardless of the distance you are racing, S&C should be a staple of a triathlon-training program year round, despite this title suggesting that it is a ‘winter’ focus. Personally, this has been an aspect of my training that has been lacking, despite my regular core work. I have been planning to incorporate it into my training for a while, but timing is everything.

New To Strength & Conditioning?

If, like me, you haven’t been ‘lifting’ for some time, the delayed onset muscle soreness that comes hand in hand with S&C work can be rather hindering to the rest of your training. This isn’t particularly what you want during the race season. Consequently, I am only just starting to fully incorporate it into my schedule since completing my season on the Gold Coast this September.

I have mentioned several benefits above, and will delve into more detail on them in future posts. In the meantime I will introduce a couple of options that you can do to ensure you are reaping the benefits of S&C work.

 

Where To Start

A great place to start is calisthenics, or bodyweight training. It is (or rather can be!) a less stressful way to introduce your body to S&C work. I feel that it is a highly functional form of fitness. The second option is hitting the bar, no, not for drinks, but for free weights. Weightlifting is a great way to add additional load to your S&C program (literally!) and opens up a number of options to the exercises you can be performing. Therefore, combining weights with calisthenics should hopefully provide the most benefits to your training and racing.

More details of both of these training methods will soon follow in future posts.

To follow my progress as a Team GB Triathlete head over to my blog page!

Be TrueSapien. Challenge Life.